EMBS Topic: kV X-ray Digital Tomosynthesis Image Tracking of Respiratory Motion During The Delivery of MV Radiotherapy Treatment of Cancer-2017-09-20

Event Information
Event Name: 
EMBS Topic: kV X-ray Digital Tomosynthesis Image Tracking of Respiratory Motion During The Delivery of MV Radiotherapy Treatment of Cancer
Event Date: 
09/20/2017 - 7:30pm
Event Location: 
Room M-114 of the Alway Bldg., Stanford University School of Medicine
Event Details
Event Type: 
Lecture
Event Details: 

EMBS, Wednesday Evening, Sept. 20, 2017

Topic: kV X-ray Digital Tomosynthesis Image Tracking of Respiratory Motion During The Delivery of MV Radiotherapy Treatment of Cancer.
Speaker: Larry Partain, Director of Clinical Research, TeleSecurity Sciences, Silicon Valley Operations,Los Altos, CA
Date and Time: Wednesday, September 20, 2017, 7:30 PM
Location: Room M-114 of the Alway Bldg., Stanford University School of Medicine (see campus map at link below).

Optional dinner location: Stanford Hospital cafeteria, 6:15 PM (no host, no reservations, self-serve)

The Stanford campus map is at: https://campus-map.stanford.edu/
Parking is usually free after 5 PM at Roth Way Garage, which is at the corner of Roth Way and Campus Drive on the map. The Stanford Hospital Cafeteria is across Campus Drive from Roth Way Garage and near the Emergency entrance. The meeting is in Room M-114 of the Alway Building, which is also across Campus Drive from Roth Way Garage, and Room M114 is accessible from outside the Alway Building.

Topic Description
External beam radiotherapy, widely applied in the treatment of cancer, directs a constantly re-shaped beam of gamma rays (i.e. MeV photons) from outside a patient to non-surgically enter the patient’s body to destroy a malignant lesion, as this focused treatment beam circles the patient’s body, for a lesion positioned near the center of rotation. A priority early application is treatment of lung cancer in free breathing patients where the cancer lesion can easily move up and down a cm or more during respiratory cycles (every 4 to 6 sec.) for continuous treatments that can typically last a minute or more. Since real time viewing of respiratory motion of objects has not usually been available during radiotherapy, the standard protocol delivers this lethal dose over the total volume traversed by the lesion during multiple breathing cycles. Unfortunately this directly kills about 2% of the patients treated and seriously injures a larger fraction due to the radiation damage to healthy surrounding lung tissues, the heart, the spinal cord and other “organs at risk” including the ribs. The success of this x-ray tomosynthesis tracking technology has the potential to significantly reduce the magnitude of such collateral damage.